Club News & Events

Summer Outdoor Tournaments 2019

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2019 Summer Outdoor Tournaments:

The Summer Outdoor Tournaments will continue June through September. Each tournament is two weeks long. First round matches begin on Monday and/or Tuesday.
There will be no extensions to any tournament. Please do not sign-up for a tournament if you are not available for the full duration of the event. Please be courteous as any scheduling conflict effects the entire tournament and note you may be defaulted if you cannot attend your match.
Matches will be played on the outdoor clay courts, usually beginning at 6:00pm on weekdays and early mornings on the weekends. In the event of rain, matches will be moved inside as long as there are courts available.
All participants will receive a t-shirt and awards will be presented to the finalists in each division. Scoring and play format may vary depending on the size of the draw. Entry deadlines are listed. Players will be contacted about their first round opponent.

Have fun and good luck to all!                                    $20 + tax per entrant

 

2019 Summer Outdoor Tournament Schedule: 

Event                                                               Date                                  Deadline

Men’s & Women’s 50’s & 70’s Singles          June 5 – 16                       June 3

Men’s & Women’s 60’s Singles                      June 19 – 30                    June 17

Men’s & Women’s 50’s & 70’s Doubles        July 10 – 21                      July 8

Men’s & Women’s 60’s Doubles                    July 24 – August 4        July 22

 

Men’s & Women’s 2.5 & 3.5 Singles              August 7 – 18                   August 5

Men’s & Women’s 3.0 & 4.0+ Singles           August 21 – Sept. 1       August 19

Men’s & Women’s 2.5 & 3.5 Doubles            Sept. 4 – 15                      Sept. 3

Men’s & Women’s 3.0 & 4.0+ Doubles         Sept. 18 – 29                   Sept. 16

Club News & Events

AHC’s Annual Bus Trip to the US Open – Monday, August 26th, 2019

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Join the Aspen Hill Club for a full day US Open experience!

Monday, August 26, 2019 – 6:00am to 11:30pm:

  • 6:00am—leave the Aspen Hill Club (parking in AHC parking lot)
  • 11:00am—arrive at the  USTA National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows\
  • 7:00pm—leaving the USTA National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows
  • 11:30pm—arrive at the Aspen Hill Club

Cost: $175 + tax per person

Cost includes bus cost, tolls, travel fees and tickets to the US Open on Monday, August 26, 2019. Tickets grant Access into the upper level of Arthur Ashe Stadium, access to all other stadiums and the entire outside courts. Members can travel from court to court watching their favorite players and shop in all the tennis stores.

  • Only 53 spaces available. Must have minimum of 30 participants by 7/1/19.
  • First Come First Serve, No Refunds, – tickets are able to be transferred to other members
  • Taking a Charter bus with TV’s , bathroom and Wi-Fi
  • Open to non-members—must pay upon registration
  • Children must be accompanied by an adult

Questions? Contact Tennis Director, Terrance Scott at terrance.scott@aspenhillclub.com or ext. 121.

Tennis

Key to Success: Doubles Players Responsibilities – May 2019

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Server—The server is responsible for keeping track of the score and to announce before the start of every point. They are also responsible for finding your opponents weakness, communicating with their partner and making about 70% of first serves in. The server should take some pace off to make sure this happens.

Servers Partner (Net Player) – The net player should try and be as active as possible at the net looking to pick off anything near the middle of the court. They are also responsible for excellent movement during the point, moving forward when they can see the ball and moving back when they can’t see the ball. Lastly, they are responsible for volleying to the other net player when opportunity presents itself.

Returner—The number one responsibility is to get the ball back in play, preferably away from the net player. The returner should also try to keep the ball low to the server or over the net players head. They are also responsible for trying to get to the net themselves. The team that gets to the net first usually wins the point.

Returners Partner—This player is responsible for assisting the returner with calling serves out, usually deep serves. They should also be alert and keep their eyes on the other net player in case they try and poach. Lastly, this player should be looking to poach on any ball near the center of the court.

Now that you know what your responsibilities are on the court when playing doubles, make sure you are out there doing your job to help you and your partner be as successful as possible. Keep on Playing!

 

Tennis

Key to Success: Doubles Partners Traffic Pattern – April 2019

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In order to be successful in doubles, it is very important for you to have great chemistry with your partner. There are certain traffic patterns some of the best doubles duos abide by between points to keep them both with a positive attitude and working together during the match. Here are the traffic patterns great teams do during every match.

Step 1: After the point is over, immediately make eye contact with your partner.

Step 2: Connect with each other with a high five or a fist pump. This step is extremely important after you or your partner looses a point or makes a stupid unforced error. Your roles as partners are to motivate and encourage one another all the way to the end of the match. If this step is skipped over, then your partner may think you are mad at them even if you are not as it is simply human nature for us to think that way.

Step 3: Walk your partner back to the baseline. During this time is when you discuss strategy and find out where your partner will be serving or returning the ball.

Step 4: Run up to the net in your position for the next point. By doing this, you set the tone as if you and your partner have a master plan and you are ready to execute it. There is also a bit of an intimidation factor in there as well. I’m sure everyone has seen Nadal jumping around during the coin toss along with his fast sprint to the baseline to get warmed up. There is a lot of gamesmanship there as he is sending a message to his opponent that he is ready to hustle for every point and you are in for a tough battle my friend.

If you want to watch all these steps played out to perfection, watch the Bryan brothers play a match and you will see them execute these steps between each point. It’s one of the things that make them the best. Keep on Playing!​

 

Member Spotlight

Member Spotlight: Eric’s Sweet Spot

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Ever since Eric’s parents, Thu and David, left Vietnam 40 years ago they have lived in the United States working very hard to provide for their two sons. Language has been a barrier for them, but instilling hard work into the mindset of sons Eric and Austin has come from their sacrifices.

Eric entered his teen years knowing that his family had it tougher than others, but he also had a role model—his brother Austin. “Austin left for California for college, and he’s been on his own since,” explains Eric. During this time, when Eric was just entering his teen years and Austin was in college, Eric’s father was diagnosed with throat cancer. At the age of 13, while Eric was stressed about his father’s health and what he would do for college himself, he used tennis to distress. “I went to play tennis with my friends one day and I hit the sweet spot of the racket, and I loved it!

Eric became consumed with learning as much as he could about tennis, this included YouTube videos, endless Google searches, and anything else that those of us that are “Tennis Nerds” can relate to! “Tennis became my way of dealing with everything,” Eric explains, “It became my passion and also my distraction tool.

 

Eric’s mother saw her son’s attention to tennis and wanted to help him play more tennis. “My mom worked at the hospital with Susan Towe (AHC member). Susan told my mom information about junior tennis classes, such as prices, and we knew we couldn’t afford that” explained Eric.

When Susan figured out that cost was an issue, she made a decision that would alter Eric’s ability to get onto the tennis court, she gave the family information on Fred’s ACES. Eric has now been attending World Class Elite at Aspen Hill Club and is an integral part of the program; Tennis Director Terrance Scott explains,  “Eric is an incredibly hard worker who leads by example. Our program is better because of Eric.

Fred’s ACES is a 501c(3) scholarship fund set up in memory of longtime Aspen Hill Club member Fred Sommer. Fred’s ACES provides scholarship opportunities to kids, of all ages and levels, across Montgomery County that face obstacles when it comes to getting onto the tennis court. The funds have assisted over 50 kids ranging in age from 8-17 years old, fully funding their tennis classes at The Aspen Hill Club. “Fred’s ACES was a dream come true for me, it fundamentally changed my life” explains Eric.

Since picking up a racket at the age of 13, Eric has developed into a force on the tennis court. He is entering his third year on the high school team at Gaithersburg High School, where he has been Varsity Captain for three years. Last year Eric played #2 on the varsity team, “ What I love about tennis is the strategy that it takes and the need to analyze your opponent. Figuring things out on the fly is key in tennis.

 

Eric is in his senior year at Gaithersburg this year and is looking forward to attending the University of Pennsylvania on a full scholarship/financial aid package next year. When Eric had his interview with UPenn, he was able to select where his admissions interview would take place, this decision was easy for him. “My interview was at Aspen Hill. At Aspen Hill and though Fred’s ACES, I learned that there are good people out there that want to help. I am forever inspired.

 

 

Eric, thank you for adding so much to our tennis program at Aspen Hill Club. You have grown into a leader and your coaches at Aspen Hill are so proud of you and cannot wait to see the great contributions you’ll make in this world.

 

 

Kids

Aspen Hill Club Hosts Kids From Around The Nation

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February brought an incredibly special event to The Aspen Hill Club—our Club and members served as hosts to the 2019 Winter Invitational. This special junior tennis tournament brought nearly 60 kids representing seven cities across the nation (DC, Boston, Dallas, Harlem, Philly, and Trenton) to learn and compete on and off the court. Each city sent USTA Local Excellence programs to the event.

USTA Excellence centers are designed to use tennis as a vehicle to educate and bring opportunities (on and off the court) to underserved youth. In addition to playing tennis at the Winter Invitational, players were treated to guest speakers including USTA National coaches, a college coach forum, and leadership skills and lessons by Win4Life.

To be a member of a USTA Excellence team, players must do much more than be strong players. Players must have at least a 3.0 GPA, conduct at least four community service events a year, complete a USTA NJTL Essay competition, and compete on local and national tennis events. While competing at the Winter Invitational, all players from across the country united and prepared over 200 lunches for the Montgomery County Coalition for the homeless – Home Builders Care Assessment Center (HBCAC) Men’s Emergency Shelter.

Former Aspen Hill member (and standout tennis player) Jeri Ingram had the idea to bring this event to a place that meant so much to her, “My dad  (Joe Ingram) was a member of Aspen Hill and brought me to summer camp when I was 9 years old, that’s where I met Vicki (my first coach) and Jeff Klein. Tennis changed my life and “if there was one person responsible for me enjoying the game of tennis and believing in my ability, it would be Jeff,” Jeri recalls. Bringing kids from across the country to the place where she began her tennis playing was incredibly special for Jeri, “I thought back to how many people helped me at Aspen Hill and at Springbrook High and I know it’s my obligation to reach others.”

Jeri played college tennis at the University of Maryland before playing pro tennis and having a world ranking. She returned to college after playing on the pro tour. Her career goal was to become a college athletic director, but after working with kids, she knew she had a different calling, she explains: “As I began working with kids that can’t afford tennis, I wanted to do more. The more kids I reach, the more I want to do.”

Jeri founded Metropolitan Tennis & Education Group six years ago to help kids have opportunities that they ordinarily wouldn’t, “It’s an awesome opportunity to teach kids and prepare them for college,” says Jeri. MTEF currently has 30 kids on their team, and “We have a GPA of 3.7,” boasts Jeri.

The 2019 Winter Invitational was a huge success. The kids played phenomenal tennis and were treated to learning from college tennis coaches. The kids had a blast and loved the facilities offered by The Club.  “We appreciate AHC hosting the event, because of community involvement events like this can happen. It’s a heavy lift and we need great support like we received from Aspen Hill” explained Jeri.

 

Aspen Hill was lucky to watch such great tennis and meet so many fabulous new faces!

Tennis

Key to Success: Lob To The Backhand Side – March 2019

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When stepping on the court to play a new player, the first thing you should identify is whether your opponent is left handed or right handed. This will help you identify where your lobs should be hit. By establishing this in the warm-up, there will be no indecision when it’s time for you to execute your lobs, because you have already identified where you need them to go before the beginning of the match. You are not always going to be able to hit the perfect topspin lob that lands deep, just inside the baseline. During a point, if you can hit your lob to your opponent’s backhand side and it falls a little short, usually that shot will not come back as your opponent will miss hit it. If your opponent is able to get the ball back, it will likely come back weak and you will have an opportunity to put the point away.

Most players can not hurt you from their backhand side. If you are just out there hitting lobs to your opponent’s forehand side, then your opponent will likely finish the point and you will not give yourself an opportunity to be successful. Play smart and hit your lobs to your opponent’s backhand side.

As always, Keep On Playing.

 

Tennis

WILSON UNVEILS THE CLASH!

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By: Tim Hahn, Owner, Aspen Hill Pro Shop

Wilson believes its new Clash has the potential to redefine the tennis racquet. The uniqueness of the frame lies in its blending of extreme flexibility with high-end stability. The success of the marriage stems from two new technologies. FreeFlex is a proprietary carbon mapping construction that allows the frame to bend in new dimensions—both horizontally and vertically—when compared to a traditional frame. This is designed to increase ball pocketing and dwell time for enhanced feel and control. But to preserve integrity through the swing on such a flexible racquet, StableSmart frame geometry allows the Clash to bend where its designed to, while still providing enough backbone to handle incoming pace and return it with interest. There are two frames in the initial launch: Clash 100 and Clash 100 Tour. Both have a 100 square-inch head, 16×19 string pattern and a constant 24.5 mm beam. The difference lies in the weight, an unstrung 100 checks in at 10.4oz while the 100 Tour is 10.9 oz. This racquet is best used by players who may have arm, elbow, or shoulder issues due to the flexible frame to provide comfort when hitting the ball. Stop by the Pro Shop, Tim and his staff will gladly assist you with your tennis needs and questions.

 

Tennis

Battle of the Ages Wrap Up

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On Friday, January 11, 2019 we had our annual Battle of the Ages Event. Once again the adults finished victorious winning a very close tournament, 6 to 5. The adults displayed their wisdom and knowledge of the game schooling the youngsters once again. I am very proud of how the juniors played because last year they were destroyed by the adults and really was taught a valuable lesson. They learned that just hitting the ball as hard as they can was not going to get them far in this game. From that loss last year the juniors came back stronger this year by playing smart, using the entire court, playing with a variety of pace and they even got up to the net. Thank you to both the adults and juniors for making this great fun event a huge success!

 

Tennis

Key to Success: Overhead Placement Over Power – February 2019

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One of the biggest mistakes tennis players make when trying to win a point with overhead is by focusing more on power over placement. In my opinion, placement is far more important than trying to hit the ball hard. A lot of times an overhead is hit as hard as you can right back to your opponent. This may work against some players but against other players who have excellent hands and are very skilled at defensive shots, that ball is going to come back every time.

How many times has this happened to you? You hit an overhead to your opponent, they block it back, you hit it harder, they block it back again and then you miss the third overhead deep or into the net. We all know what happens when you or your opponent brings one more ball back. It usually ends with an error.

The key to success is taking a little bit of pace off of the overhead and focus more on placing the ball where your opponent is not. I always tell my students that I’d rather hit a 30mph winner than a 100mph ball that’s coming back. Use your short angles of the court, place the ball where your opponent is not or simply hit the overhead down the middle when playing doubles.  Your overheads will really become great when you can execute your shots with both power and placement. Until then, just keep it simple and focus more on your placement.

Keep on Playing!